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Book Review | The Glamourist by Luanne G. Smith


Book Description


Print Length: 282 pages
Publisher: 47North (June 9, 2020)
Publication Date: June 9, 2020

A spellbinding novel of bloodlines, self-discovery, and redemption by the author of the Washington Post bestseller The Vine Witch.

Abandoned as a child in turn-of-the-century Paris, Yvette Lenoir has longed to uncover the secrets of her magical heritage and tap her suppressed powers. But what brave and resourceful Yvette has done to survive the streets has made her a fugitive. With a price on her head, she clings to a memento from her past—what she believes to be a grimoire inherited from the mother she never knew. To unlock the secrets of her past, Yvette trusts in one woman to help solve the arcane riddles among its charmed pages.

Elena Boureanu is the vine witch of Château Renard, noted for its renowned wines. Even as she struggles with her own bloodline—and its poisonous threat to her future—Elena can’t ignore a friend on the run. Joined by a cunning thief, the proprietor of an enchanted-curio shop, and a bewitching black cat, Elena and Yvette are determined to decode Yvette’s mysterious keepsake. But what restless magic will be unleashed? And what are Yvette and Elena willing to risk to become the witches they were destined to be?


My Review – Rave

Rating: 5 out of 5.

The Glamourist picks up where The Vine Witch leaves off and is even more enjoyable than its predecessor (and that is saying a lot). More magic, more mayhem, and endearing characters make this story the perfect escape.

What I Loved

Elena is always a treat of a character. I loved her in The Vine Witch and loved getting to learn more about her in this story. Raised by her grandparents, they taught her the art of being a Vine Witch. In The Vine Witch, she learns that her parents specialized in poisons. As the story opens, the witch board has changed her registration from Vine Witch to Poison Witch, which starts her on a self-discovery path that she did not anticipate. She is more sympathetic to Yvette, who doesn’t even know what kind of witch she is because a non-magical friend of her mothers raised her. The journey that they go on together is harrowing, suspenseful, and will keep you on the edge of your seat in anticipation of what will happen next.

I love the creation of a much broader magical world in this story. Jean-Paul and Elena head to Paris, where witches and humans live in harmony, albeit separately. There are specialty stores for witches and the governing board’s building – all of the city’s features that are designed for humans to overlook. Also, the world of the fae is introduced in this story.  King Oberon and the fairy world are a fun addition to an already exciting story.

I loved the suspense and never-ending action. There is so much going on starting on page one and not letting up to the very end that I did not want to put it down. I would never expect this journey of self-discovery would be so fraught with peril, but it is. I also enjoy the historical aspects. The story is set around the turn of the century, and just little things, like Elena not knowing how to use a telephone, are so unexpected and so valid for the setting. It adds a bit of humor at surprising times.

To Read or Not to Read

A great summer read full of action, suspense, and magic that will keep you on the edge of your seat with your book in hand.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Categories: Books fantasy Reviews

Tessa

See my “About me” on my site.

6 replies

    1. The Vine Witch (book 1) was an Amazon Prime First Reads book and got a bit of attention. That was my first experience with this author. She tells a good story. Very creative.

      Like

    1. Book 1 starts on the slow side but ends with a bang. Book 2 is action throughout. I think book 2 can be read independently. It refers to book 1 in the beginning but quickly goes its own way.

      Like

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